Birthday Party Ideas for a 14-Year-Old

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By the time your child hits the early teenage years, you can count on more input and advice from her regarding what she wants at her birthday party. Listen to what she wants, but don’t be afraid to put your foot down if anything seems too wild or beyond your budget. A 14th birthday party is a great time for your teenager to display some of her newly earned maturity.

Focus on an Activity

Think of what your teenager enjoys doing when she has time off from school. If she’s constantly asking to go to the mall, plan a mall-centered party. A teenager who enjoys time ice skating may enjoy a party at the local rink. Other activities could be a dance contest, a party at a bowling alley or a trip to a local ball game. Picking one activity to highlight during the party will make it simpler to organize, plan and keep under control.

Food and Drink

Although a birthday cake shaped like his favorite cartoon character was a hit a few years ago, stick with slightly more sophisticated fare for your child’s 14th birthday party. Make a layer cake, frost with his favorite frosting and keep the cake decoration minimal. Select one or two flavors of ice cream or serve small, prepackaged ice cream cups. Bite-size appetizers, such as pizza bites or mini hot dogs, are popular with teenagers. Have small cans of soda and bottled water available to drink.

Decorations

Decorations for a 14-year-old’s birthday party should be fun and vibrant. You don’t want your child to deem the decorations corny, though. Consult with her about ways to decorate. You may want to skip plates and napkins that shout “Happy Birthday!” and go with a solid color or fun print instead. A centerpiece that focuses on the party’s primary activity is a nice touch. Ask your child before hanging banners, balloons or streamers.

More Responsibilities

A great way to honor your child’s 14th birthday is by throwing a party that puts more responsibility on his shoulders. For instance, take a small group of his friends to a ball game or concert. You’ll send the message that you recognize that he is growing up and that you expect him to behave well during the outing. You can also have a sleepover party for your teenager. Remember to be firm about the rules before the party and keep a close, but not too close, eye on things.

Coed Parties

As your child gets older, members of the opposite sex become more appealing. Boys and girls tend to socialize with each other in the early teenage years, so don’t panic if your daughter wants to invite boys to her party or your son wants to invite girls. Instead, lay basic ground rules in advance. If you are uncomfortable with certain coed games, such as Spin-the-Bottle being played, tell your 14-year-old. Keep a close eye on the proceedings, but don’t hover too much or else you risk upsetting the birthday child.

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