The Best Family Video Games

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To say that kids like to play video games is like saying men like to have the remote control or that women like diamonds. It's a given. The Kaiser Family Foundation website reported in 2002 that 92 percent of kids aged 2 to 17 play video games and spend an average of about an hour a day doing so. As a parent, you probably want to make sure your child is playing family video games.

To say that kids like to play video games is like saying men like to have the remote control or that women like diamonds. It's a given. The Kaiser Family Foundation website reported in 2002 that 92 percent of kids aged 2 to 17 play video games and spend an average of about an hour a day doing so. As a parent, you probably want to make sure your child is playing family video games.

Look at the Rating

When you look for a family video game, pay attention to the rating, according to information on the Microsoft website. Most video games get a rating to provide parents with information about the content of the game. Consider the rating and recommendations from your friends and family to pick suitable family video games. Small children should have games rated "G." If you intend to play with your child, you might consider an adventure role-playing game rated "PG."

Story Telling

Very young children might like story-telling games. Some video games feature a familiar fairy tale that allows the players to perform certain actions. Little children like a slower pace, according to the Family Gamer website.

Sports

Sports-related games that you can play on an interactive gaming system are usually good choices. Sports games are fun for the family because they recreate real competitive sports, which is appealing to parents and kids. Some games focus more on action and others on strategy, according to the GamePeople website.

Stay Away From Violence

You might want to steer away from violent video games. Violent games could lead children to have increased aggressive thoughts, feelings and behaviors, according to a study by Craig A. Anderson and Brad J. Bushman, published in the September 2001 edition of the journal, "Psychological Science." Interactive violent games can be particularly bad, because they reward children for being violent.

Tips

When choosing family video games, look for games that match your child's maturity level, according to information on the Raise Smart Kid website. Also, look for games that encourage group play with multiple players. Games that require your child to make decisions provide a better learning experience than games that encourage punching or theft. Keep in mind, however, that children, especially boys, like to be in a fantasy world where they can be the hero.

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